11+ Best Bass Headphones in 2020 To Rock Your World!


Different headphones flaunt different sound signature profiles, meaning that not all headphones are intended for the same types of music. Some music is better heard with head-rattling bass in the lower end, from good-old funk to death metal’s most extreme. For such musical genres, you need a pair of quality headphones that prioritize bass without compromising other frequencies. 

The problem with most so-called best bass headphones is that they prioritize bass at the expense of their sub-bass response, which makes for a poorly balanced, ear-jarring sound that’s fairly hard to enjoy.

Luckily, you no longer need to tolerate such gimmicky headphones because this article will help shed light on the absolute best bass headphones on the market today, so stay tuned.

Top 3 Best Bass Headphones in 2020

IMAGE PRODUCT DETAILS Check price
Best Overall Best Overall Sony WH1000XM3
  • Top Notch Sound Cancellation, Superb Battery Life
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Runner-Up Runner Up Audio-Technica ATH-M50x
  • Comfortable Construction, Clear Sound
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Best Cable Best Value  Beats Studio 3
  • Great Noise Cancellation,
    22 Hours Battery Life
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11+ Best Bass Headphones in 2020

1. Sony WH1000XM3Best Overall

best bass headphones

With both arms behind its back, the Sony WH1000XM3 over-ears can stand in front of any pair of noise-canceling best bass headphones and come out victorious. This bass headphone does a sublime job of displaying Sony’s efforts to perfect audio playback and adaptability. No matter where you are, the WH1000XM3 will offer stellar playback with enough bass to launch you to Mars. 

Design-wise, the XM3 features a slightly different headband than its predecessor. The profile is much lower unlike these best headphones under 300, which makes the XM3 look sleeker and more attractive. To add, the headband has a two-tone finish that’s accentuated with pleather coating over the pads. The ear cups are fairly similar to the predecessor’s, and they come in two appealing color variants: black and silver.

Like most closed-back over-ears, the WH1000XM3 lacks in the breathability department. They won’t warm up your ear too much like these best bone conduction headphones, but they will certainly seal them and prevent airflow, which is why I wouldn’t recommend them for running or working out. In terms of stability, the XM3 is way more stable than the XM2, but that won’t stop them from swaying during intense activities. 

The sound profile of the WH1000XM3 is bass-dominant with fairly minor treble, making this an excellent pair of headphones for music genres such as electronics and dubstep. If you’re not a fan of the XM3’s sound profile, you can use Sony’s Headphones Connect app to alter the EQs to your liking. As far as the frequency response consistency, it’s just as great as the XM2’s similar to these ones

On a single charge, the Sony XM3 will last you about 30 hours, which is roughly 10 hours more than most of its competitors. The XM3 flaunts a Quick Charge feature that will offer you 5 hours’ worth of playback after just 10 minutes of charging. Other qualities that are worth noting include aptX and aptX HD support, Google Assistant integration, and top-notch active noise cancellation.

Pros

  • Solid construction and ideal stability
  • Superb battery life of up to 30 hours
  • Flaunts Google Assistant integration
  • Great noise cancellation capabilities
  • USB-C port for super-fast charging

Cons

  • Touch controls can be a little fiddly
  • Not the best as far as breathability

2. Audio-Technica ATH-M50x Runner Up


If you’re into headphones that flaunt an all-black utilitarian appearance, you’ll definitely love the M50x from Audio Technica, as this is the ultimate pair of headphones for minimalists. The M50x flaunts slightly large ear cups, which makes it more comfortable and more accommodating to larger ears. The cups have a flat oval shape that I personally find appealing. 

One thing I’m not quite fond of is the padding. It’s comfortable when the headphones are stable on your head, but once you attempt to adjust or move them, the padding begins to feel a bit stiff, unlike these best headphones for under 200$

Overall, the Audio Technica ATH M50x  looks elegant, especially in the black color scheme. If you want it to look more flashy and eye-catching, opt for the white, gunmetal, or black/purple color variants. 

The ATH-M50x’s breathability is decent. It’ll make your ears slightly warm, but not in an irritating way. This is expected since the M50x is a closed-back over-ear model.

As far as stability goes, it is designed for casual use only. If you wear it as you’re engaged in any high-intensity activity, it’ll easily slip off your ears.

The M50x has one of the most accurate bass responses I’ve ever got the pleasure of hearing. It provides just the right amount of rumble and punch, thanks to its flat and neutral response, while remaining deep and pronounced. Its higher bass frequencies tend to have a tiny bump that may slightly clutter your mix if you’re using these headphones professionally, so keep that in mind. 

This pair of best bass headphones doesn’t feature noise-canceling capabilities, so they do leak a little bit.

The overall build quality of this unit is pretty remarkable. You don’t have to worry about it giving up on you after a year of use or so. Further, it features a collapsible design that helps enhance portability and save space. Also, the unit comes with a detachable cable for your convenience.

Pros

  • Notably comfortable over-ear design
  • Sturdy construction that’s built to last
  • Package includes a detachable cable 
  • Ideal accuracy with bass frequencies
  • Accommodating cups for bigger ears

Cons

  • Doesn’t feature any control scheme
  • Ear cup padding could be improve


3. Beats Studio 3Best For Comfort 


The Beats Studio 3 is a mixed-usage pair with a sleek design that’s easy to use, simple control scheme, and ultra-comfortable fit. It’s one of the best headphones on this list in terms of noise canceling. The Studio 3’s adaptive sound quality is better than the original Beats. I’m very fond of the seamlessly blended buttons and the overall uncluttered design. 

Comfort-wise, the Beats Studio 3 is especially comfortable and lightweight, so it won’t feel like a burden sitting on top of your head like these closed over ear headphones. The ear cups feature high-quality padding, and they’re big enough to accommodate virtually all ear sizes. The unit has a fairly tight fit, but it doesn’t feel irritating at all, considering how the pressure of the clamping force is distributed evenly around the ears. 

Now, one thing I’ve noticed is that the care given to the headband isn’t as much as that given to the headband in terms of cushioning. The headbang feels rigid, but not too rigid that it becomes a concern. You can wear the Beats Studio 3 for hours on end without feeling irritated. And since this pair flaunts a tight fit, you’ll find them to be extremely stable throughout intense activities. 

The Studio 3’s sound profile is on the darker side, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The Beats also feature an auto-calibration functionality that adapts to the user and the environment around them to ensure optimal sound quality. It’s not always as consistent as it should be, but it’s alright for what it is. The sound profile is ideal for most music genres, especially the bass-driven ones. 

In terms of bass accuracy, it varies from one user to the other depending on the sound quality of the fit and seal, as well as other factors. However, you should expect good amounts of thump from the sub-bass frequencies and a notable punch in the mid-bass region.

As far as the battery life, you should expect up to 22 hours of full-featured playback and a total charge time of 2 hours.

Pros

  • Great stability during intense activities
  • Comfortable and durable construction
  • Seamless and aesthetically appealing
  • Excellent noise-canceling technology
  • Offers up to 22 hours of listening time

Cons

  • Bass delivery isn’t always consistent
  • Not optimal for videos due to latency

4. V-MODA Crossfade LP2Budget Choice

I’m not a huge fan of the original Crossfade, so when the LP2 came out, it completely flew over my head. Let me tell you, that was a serious mistake on my end. The main reason I didn’t enjoy the original Crossfade was that it wasn’t very comfortable or stable. The LP2, on the other hand, is quite the contrary. You can run marathons with this unit and it wouldn’t move an inch. 

Are they perfect headphones? Far from it, but considering how cost-effective they are, you just can’t help but admire the craftsmanship. The LP2 flaunts the same unique look that virtually all V-MODA products adopt but with slight changes, including thicker padding around the ear cups and a conveniently foldable frame that’s very similar to the V-MODA Crossfade M100. 

Compared to previous iterations of the Crossfade, the LP2 features the best padding out of the bunch. It’s quite bulky compared to other units on this list, but it’s still pretty comfortable. The fit is just as tight as the M100’s, but with better pressure distribution to ensure optimal comfort. It’s worth noting that the size of the ear cups might not suit everyone due to their narrower opening. 

The LP2 is above-average when it comes to breathability; your ears will get warm, but not to the extent that you’ll feel required to take the headphones off. The control scheme is excellent. It has all of the necessary functions, from track skipping and volume controls to call handling. I also love the tactility of the feedback that the buttons give when pressed. Superb build and sound quality overall. 

The bass performance of the Crossfade LP2 is decent all across. It’s a bit flat, but with the help of 4dB of overemphasizing, the sound gains a lot of bass-heavy flavors.

Where this model really shines is in its mid-range area. It’s consistent and pretty much flawless. The LP2 is a wired unit, and so it comes with a Kevlar-reinforced cable that’ll last you for many years to come.

Pros

  • Outstanding mid-range performance 
  • Offers a lot of customization options
  • Comfortable and extremely stable fit
  • Control scheme is easy to figure out 
  • Every component is built like a tank

Cons

  • Noise cancellation isn’t all that good
  • Too much clamping pressure initially

5. Sony WHXB700Best Value For Money

Most budget bass headphones overemphasize the bass at the expense of other frequencies, so it’s hard to find a wallet-friendly pair of headphones with optimal bass and sub-bass frequencies, but it’s not impossible. Sony’s WHXB700 is probably the best pair of bass headphones that you can without spending a fortune, as it comes equipped with Sony’s signature Extra Bass technology.

The Sony WHXB700 are on-ear headphones that feature very well-padded cups and headband to ensure optimal comfort. The cups are oddly large considering the unit’s on-ear design, which may result in upper-ear discomfort if you have large ears. Generally speaking, if you have large ears, you want to opt for over-ear headphones rather than on-ear models to ensure comfort. 

The headphones are very lightweight at under half a pound just like these best trucker headsets, and the headband’s clamping force isn’t too prominent that it becomes irritating. With that said, I would only recommend this unit for casual use and light jogs at most, as it doesn’t provide enough stability for intense activities. In terms of durability, the unit is made from thin plastic, so consider handling it with utter care. 

The WH-XB700’s bass frequency response is pretty good considering its price. The bass is prominent but not overdone to the point that the clarity of mid and higher frequencies is overshadowed. You’re going to find it easy to discern every detail with these best bass headphones. In the low-bass region, you’ll notice a lot of thumping, which you, as someone who enjoys bass-heavy music, will enjoy. 

When it comes to battery lifespan, the WHB700 doesn’t disappoint, as it offers up to 30 hours of listening time. The Sony Headphones Connect app allows you to optimize the sound settings to your liking to achieve your desired sound quality. Additional features that this unit offers onboard NFC and voice assistant support. Definitely, an awesome pick if you’re on a tight budget.

Pros

  • Bass qualities are deep and thumping
  • Pleasant, well-padded construction
  • Voice assistant and built-in NFC tech
  • Compatible with Sony’s Connect app
  • Available at a cost-effective price tag

Cons

  • Not the most durable unit on the list
  • Subpar noise isolation performance

6. Skullcandy Crusher– Decent Overall Choice

The Skullcandy Crusher is the ultimate definition of an oddball in the world of best bass headphones. People just can’t seem to make up their minds on whether they like these headphones or hate them. I’m happy to break the divisiveness by saying that if you’re in search of a budget-friendly Skullcandy that offers ultra-deep, punchy bass, you just can’t go wrong with the Skullcandy Crusher. 

Most experts preach that it’s best to opt for a pair of headphones that display a V-shaped sound profile. This isn’t the case with the Crusher, as it has a U-shaped profile that’s a bit skewed. This basically means that the emphasis is on lower bass frequencies. This also means that the clarity of higher and mid-range frequencies will be questionable, which some people may not like. 

Simply put, if you care solely about overpowered low-end bass, you’re going to like this unit, but if you’re looking for bass headphones that don’t push the bass to the limits and that prioritize the entire frequency range, then you should consider a different unit. Don’t get me wrong, if you pay attention, you can hear the highs and mids, but for the punctilious, these headphones aren’t the best. 

With that out of the way, let’s get into the features. The Crusher has an adjustable sensory bass feature that enables you to turn down the bass. Granted, this may result in loss of detail, but it’s oddly pleasing to the ears with genres such as hard-rock and hip-hop.

The control scheme is as simple as it can be, with the microphone, sound-track, and volume control buttons on the side. 

One of the strongest selling points of the Skullcandy Crusher is its exceptional battery life of up to 40 frigging hours. You can listen to music using these headphones continuously for around a day and a half before it requires charging. Speaking of charging, you can get 3 hours’ worth of listening time in just 10 minutes of charging time, thanks to the Crusher’s rapid charge feature. 

Pros

  • Superb battery life of up to 40 hours
  • One of the deepest bass responses
  • Notably comfortable over-ear design 
  • Control scheme is fairly easy to use
  • Sleek design and great build quality

Cons

  • Noise isolation could’ve been better
  • Mids and highs are pretty recessed

7. Bose 700– Most Versatile

Similarly to the Sony WH1000XM3, the Bose 700 is one of those headphones that can rival any bass headphones in the noise cancellation department and claim the crown. The Bose 700 also flaunts a futuristic design that sets it apart in the aesthetics department. It might not be as comfy as the models from the QuietComfort lineup, but it’s comfortable enough to appease everyone. 

Superb noise cancellation isn’t the only aspect that the Bose 700 shares with the XM3, as it also flaunts touch-sensitive surfaces on the ear cups. The main difference here is that the headband integrates seamlessly into the cups, which can’t be said about the MX3’s headband. The unit is available in three different colors: all-black, silver luxe, and arctic white. 

The Bose 700 is fairly heavier than any of Bose’s QuietComfort best bass headphones, and it clamps down more, meaning that they may get tiresome if you wear them for longer periods of time, even with a band that’s padded with an air-filled pocket. Compared to the Sony XM3, the ear cups on the Bose 700 feel a bit shallow. Luckily, they’re well-padded with a thick, plushy material.

The Bose 700 might be on the same tier as the WH1000XM3 in terms of noise cancellation, but when it comes to which headphones flaunt better bass accuracy, the Bose 700 takes the win by the storm. It features a low-frequency extension that’s down to 10 Hz, meaning that it’s capable of producing some of the lowest rumbles you can hear in music, especially electronic music. 

The bass has an ample amount of punch and thump without compromising other instruments or the vocals if there are any. The unit’s mid-range accuracy is also outstanding. It’s well-balanced and even, which allows for all instruments to shine, as well as the vocals. In terms of battery life, the Bose 700 offers up to 20 hours of listening time, which is decent.

Pros

  • Remarkably accuracy bass response
  • Excellent noise canceling capabilities
  • Sturdy build quality and futuristic look
  • Decent battery life and fast charging
  • Great touch-sensitive control scheme

Cons

  • Not the most budget-friendly option
  • Latency isn’t satisfactory for videos

8. Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro

In search of the ultimate tweakable best bass headphones? Look no further, as the Custom One Pro from Beyerdynamic has everything you’re looking for and more. Design-wise, this unit isn’t quite different from other over-ear headphones. It has large ear cups that you’ll find very comfortable, especially if you have larger ears that no other headphones seem to accommodate them. 

The headphones feature a headband that’s padded with a soft and plushy material and covered with some sort of faux leather. Beyerdynamic used velcro in order to secure the headband to an extremely sturdy metallic frame. Yes, you can easily undo the velcro to remove the headband in case you want to try a different colored one. The unit is available in black and white variants. 

The unit’s side arms are made out of metal and have a few notches on the side that indicate the size you’ve adjusted the headphones to using the size adjusters, which can be found right under the headband. It’s those plastic components that have the Beyerdynamic logo on them. The unit has 8 notches in total, allowing for 8 different adjustments to accommodate all head sizes. 

Construction isn’t the only thing that’s adjustable with the Custom One Pro. You can also adjust the sound using the sound slider, which you can find on both ear cups. The slider has 4 different bass modes: Linear, Vibrant, Light, and Heavy. In my opinion, the Linear and Vibrant modes are the best. The Light mode is too scratchy and thin, and the Heavy one is overly boomy. 

The Linear mode allows for a well-balanced sound, whereas the Vibrant mode grants you a little more bass without compromising other tonal qualities. I like how solid and detailed the mids are. Unlike many bass headphones, the treble is actually able to shine with these headphones. They come with a high-quality cable that’s equipped with a microphone and a convenient remote.

Pros

  • Adjustable head fit and sound quality
  • Well-padded headband and ear cups
  • Robust design and great build quality
  • Flaunts a large and open soundstage
  • All tonalities have a chance to shine

Cons

  • Doesn’t offer any volume controls
  • Construction is on the bulkier side

9. Cowin E7 Pro


It’s not hard to find a pair of sub-$100 best bass headphones with active noise cancellation technology, but for them to actually be good is the real challenge. The Cowin E7 Pro is currently one of the most popular products on the market today, thanks to its cost-effective price tag and noise-canceling wizardry. It also boasts decent bass response accuracy that’s worth paying attention to. 

Design-wise, the E7 Pro is almost identical to its equally popular predecessor, the E7, but with a different black plate in the ear cups. This might seem like a minor change, but it actually lends it a more premium look over its predecessor. The build quality isn’t the most astounding out there, but considering these headphones are affordable and sound great, I can’t really complain. 

The E7 Pro is very well-padded, and they’re amply comfortable, overall. However, you must note that the headband doesn’t extend that far, so if you have a large head, you’re better off buying a different pair. The E7 Pro is pretty light at about half a pound, so it won’t feel like a burden sitting on your head. In terms of stability and breathability, the E7 Pro headphones are above average. 

There are quite a few sound-related improvements over the original E7. The original produced a tinny sound that many perceived as annoying when noise canceling was activated. This issue is gone with the E7 Pro, as it flaunts a much better-balanced sound throughout its entire range. It’s equipped with a 45mm driver, so its frequency response range is wide to ensure a fuller sound. 

The Cowin E7 Pros provide quite a direct bass response that doesn’t sound overly boomy. Granted, mid-range frequencies aren’t one of this unit’s strongest suits, but we’re here for the bass, right? As claimed by the manufacturer, the E7 Pro features a battery life of up to 30 hours on a full charge. Also, it features NFC technology for contactless payments.

Pros

  • Superb bass response for the price
  • Reliable noise-canceling technology
  • Lightweight, stable, and breathable
  • Control scheme is easy to figure out
  • Great battery life and wireless range

Cons

  • Not the greatest microphone sound quality 
  • While lightweight, the body is bulky

10. 1More Triple Driver

1More might be an obscure brand compared to giants like Sony, Audio-Technica, and Bose, but the 1More Triple Driver offers enough value for you to ignore brand popularity. They’re well-built, sleek-looking, and pretty suitable for critical listening. Their strongest selling point has to be their superior comfort. They might actually be the most comfortable pair of headphones on this list. 

The 1More Triple Driver offers condensed padding around the headband and around its slender frame. To add, the ear cups are designed in such a way that they mold around the user’s ears to ensure optimal pressure distribution and supreme comfort.

While the headphones don’t feature active noise cancellation, the ear cups do a decent job of ensuring passive noise cancellation.

The headphones are also equipped with high-end bass reflectors to ensure sound realism. Additionally, the bass is deep with fairly minimal distortion, even when you push the volume to the extreme. The soundstage is broad and detailed, allowing for detailed mid-range frequencies that help balance out everything so that the bass doesn’t become too boomy that it overpowers the sound.

Moreover, the low-frequency extension on the Triple Driver is at 13 Hz, meaning that low-bass is as deep and rumbling as a bass fiend would like it to be. Mid-bass is well-balanced and relatively flat. In the higher bass area, however, the sound is a bit overemphasized. As far as the accuracy of the mid-range and treble, both are above-average, so you won’t have an overly dark sound. 

The Triple Driver headphones feature a foldable design, so they’re great in terms of portability. I also like the fingerprint-resistant aluminum alloy from which the unit is built because it ensures a clean look at all times.

It’s worth noting that the 1More Triple Driver headphones are available in an in-ear model, in case you’re not fond of over-ears. Both models are quite affordable.

Pros

  • Great bass and well-balanced sound 
  • Superb soundstage for detailed mids
  • Fairly durable aluminum construction
  • Lightweight and ultra-portable design
  • Low leakage for passive headphones

Cons

  • You’ll need to burn them in for a bit
  • Upper treble range is too recessed

11. Meze 99 Classics

Ending this list on a high note with one of the most aesthetically pleasing and greatest sounding headphones on the market today, the remarkable Meze 99 Classics. These headphones feature walnut wood ear cups that are accentuated by gold or silver metallic components, depending on which model you choose. Let me repeat that again: WALNUT! Not plastic, not aluminum. 

The 99 Classics feature a lightweight and comfortable build that you’ll enjoy during long listening sessions. The metallic headband is incredibly sturdy, and it’s covered by a leathery material that offers great comfort. The weight of the headband, which isn’t much, to begin with, is distributed evenly across the top of your head so that the headphones don’t become irritating or tiresome. 

The ear cups are on the smaller side and are pretty shallow compared to other headphones on this list, so if you have larger ears, you should consider opting for the ATH-M50x or the Custom One Pro, as their ear cups are a lot more commodious. The overall presentation of the Meze 99 Classics is nothing short of impressive. If you want to turn some heads, these are your best bet.

As far as the sound quality, the mids are warm and exuberant, especially the upper mids. I’m in love with the vocal presentation that this unit offers, as it’s well-balanced and energetic.

Further, I like how every instrument has its chance to shine in the mix. You can hear every detail clearly in the mid-range area. The treble is smooth and relaxed, with the presence of a lot of detail.

Bass-wise, the 99 Classics delivers a thick bass presence that hits you like a steam train, but it also has warmer qualities that help balance things out. The mid and upper bass regions feature a massive deal of rumble, whereas the sub-bass region is a bit underpowered. The timbre of the bass, overall, is pleasing to the ear. The 99 Classics are top-notch headphones, all in all.

Pros

  • Premium, eye-catching construction
  • Deep bass with a whole lot of thump
  • Detailed mid-range and crisp highs
  • Generous padding ensures comfort
  • Very durable Kevlar-reinforced cable

Cons

  • Not optimal for those with large ears
  • Doesn’t have a foldable construction 

How to Choose Best Bass Headphones

Bass headphones are a dime a dozen nowadays, which can make it hard for you to pinpoint the ideal headphones for you. The following paragraphs help point out the few factors that you must take into consideration if you wish to ensure getting the most value your budget can afford. Before you check them out, make sure to check out our guide on is bass bad for your ears?

Design

Most of the best bass headphones feature either an over-ear or on-ear design. Over-ear headphones are a lot more immersive than on-ear ones. They also have better passive noise cancellation, which helps concentrate the sound and accentuate the bass qualities. On-ears, on the other hand, are more breathable, which makes them more comfortable than over-ears to a certain extent. 

Driver

We can all agree that the size of the driver doesn’t indicate whether or not a pair of headphones is high-quality, especially when inspecting bass response. However, the majority of headphones that house large drivers tend to offer great bass production, no matter if it’s a coincidence or not. So, make sure you invest in a pair of headphones that have a driver that’s at least 35mm.

The driver type should also influence your selection of headphones. There are three main types of drivers: planar, dynamic, and electrostatic. All three can produce deep, thumping bass, but in terms of frequency response, planar drivers are more superior. Electrostatic drivers are second to planar drivers. Dynamic drivers are usually in cheaper headphones, so they’re third in line. 

Frequency Response

A surefire way to know whether a pair of headphones are capable of producing excellent bass or not is to consider its frequency response range. The more expansive the range is, the more dynamic the sound will be and the more notes the headphones will be able to reproduce. The golden standard for headphones is to have a frequency response of 20 Hz to 20 kHz.

The above-mentioned standard is the frequency response that the human ear can discern. This means that anything higher or lower than that range is practically useless because you won’t be able to hear it. Keep in mind, however, that low frequencies below 20 Hz can be felt rather than heard, whereas the ones beyond 20 kHz won’t be audible whatsoever. 

Impedance

Impedance is an indication of resistance in the world of sound. Generally, headphones that have higher impedance are more capable of producing great bass with a ton of rumble. However, you should note that the higher the impedance is, the more power the headphones will require. If you’ll be using the headphones solely with your smartphone, opt for low-impedance ones. 

Sensitivity

A lot of people tend to ignore sensitivity when in the market for new headphones because it can be a bit confusing, speaking from personal experience. Sensitivity is basically a measurement of how loud the volume of a pair of headphones can get without distorting. Typically, the higher the sensitivity, the less likely the sound will be distorted, so aim for the highest possible number.

Build Quality

Like I previously mentioned, good bass headphones don’t come cheap. If you want the absolute best bass response, you’ll have to shell out a considerable amount of money.

With that said, it’s imperative that you invest your money in a unit that’s built to last so that you don’t have to spend the same amount of money again. Avoid units that are made from cheap, flimsy plastic. 

Final Thoughts

There you have it, music fanatics and bass fiends, the 11+ best bass headphones available today. All of the above-listed headphones are incredible in their own regard, but if I was to crown a winner, it would be the Sony WH1000XM3, followed by the Bose 700. And if you’re on a pretty tight budget, I recommend opting for the Audio-Technica ATH-M50x or the Cowin E7 Pro.

Evan Grant

A Ukulele player, musician, boyfriend and also the lead Editor of ElectricFieldsFestival, Evan Grant is the guy who runs this site. He's a great Roger Federer fan and is always up for a game of Tennis.

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